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December 15 2015 - It's good to see St. Paul take a place among elite cities in a philanthropic initiative to help the public sector work smarter. The focus on government innovation to deliver "better results at a better price" -- on behalf of taxpayers who count on local leaders to stretch every dollar -- is worthy. St. Paul was among 13 new "What Works Cities" named last week by Bloomberg Philanthropies. Participation will provide free access to top consultants from around the nation.

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A Civic Data Standard is an open, collaboratively developed set of data schematics or semantics which facilitates interoperability between multiple providers and consumers for the public good. Civic data standards enable interoperability between data providers - typically governments - and data consumers. When a data provider publishes information, making it compatible a with a civic data standard (if one exists) can help jumpstart its use. Civic data standards also make it easier for data consumers - particularly individuals or small businesses - to consume data from multiple providers with less software engineering effort.

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December 14 2015 - Governments share lots of data with the public, and unleash more every day. Open data is improving the lives of hundreds of millions of people, many incrementally and some dramatically. If we want open data to have even greater impact, we need to think strategically about how to organize it for more effective production and consumption at scale. Recently, we started gathering a list of civic data standards. This is a launching point for using interoperability to broaden the reach of data for public good. The aim is to build a library for suppliers and consumers of government data to learn about existing standards, as well as the skills and resources to create new ones.

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December 14, 2015

CitiesToday: Thirteen more cities join Bloomberg data initiative

December 14 2015 - Bloomberg Philanthropies has announced a further 13 mid-sized cities to join its three-year programme to help mayors improve their use of data–for free. Called What Works Cities–and launched in April this year–the US$42-million initiative now counts 21 cities. All receive free customised support and technical assistance from expert partners to review their current use of data and evidence, to understand where they are utilising best practices, and to identify areas for growth.

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December 13 2015 - Bloomberg Philanthropies announced thirteen new additions to the What Works Cities initiative: Anchorage, Alaska; Bellevue, Washington; Cambridge, Massachusetts; Denton, Texas; Denver, Colorado; Independence, Missouri; Las Vegas, Nevada; Lexington, Kentucky; Saint Paul, Minnesota; San Francisco, California; San Jose, California; Tacoma, Washington; and Waco, Texas. These cities will work with expert partners to enhance data- and evidence-based practices, including releasing open data, managing performance, conducting low-cost evaluations, and structuring contracts to focus on results.

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December 11 2015 - Bloomberg Philanthropies has announced a second cohort of municipalities selected to participate in a $42 million initiative designed to enhance cities' use of data and evidence to improve services, inform local decision making, and boost citizen engagement. The cohort of thirteen cities selected for the What Works Cities initiative — Anchorage, Alaska; Bellevue, Washington; Cambridge, Massachusetts; Denton and Waco, Texas; Denver, Colorado; Independence, Missouri; Las Vegas, Nevada; Lexington, Kentucky; St. Paul, Minnesota; San Francisco and San Jose, California; and Tacoma, Washington — will receive support and technical assistance in the use of data to address local issues, including economic development, job creation, public safety, and affordable housing. To that end, data experts will review the municipalities' current use of data and evidence, identify best practices and areas for growth, and provide peer-to-peer learning opportunities with the first eight cities selected for the initiative in August.

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December 11, 2015

Citiscope: Bloomberg Philanthropies expands ‘big data’ initiative for U.S. cities

December 11 2015 - Bloomberg Philanthropies has more than doubled the size of a recently launched initiative that helps U. S. cities and their mayors harness the potential of “big data.” Thirteen U. S. municipalities have been added to the roster, expanding the total from eight to 21, the announcement says. A total of 100 American cities will be selected through 2017. What Works Cities, a $42 million program launched in April, describes itself as the largest philanthropic effort to promote use of data and analytics in the public sector. The goal is to enhance the ability of cities to collect and synthesize data in ways that bolster governance, economic opportunity, affordable housing, safety and other areas.

 

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December 11 2015 - The Bloomberg Philanthropies on Thursday announced its next round of What Works Cities participants, 13 U.S. cities that join an existing group of eight previously named local governments that will work with a coalition of partner organizations that will help leverage their data to improve decisionmaking, public services and engagement with citizens. The program is a $42 million initiative launched in April and spearheaded by the Bloomberg Philanthropies in conjunction with Results for America, the Johns Hopkins University Center for Government Excellence, the Government Performance Lab at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government, the Sunlight Foundation and the Behavioral Insights Team.

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December 11 2015 - When he was mayor of New York, Mike Bloomberg used to quote statistician W.E. Deming’s famous saying: “In God we trust. Everyone else, bring data.” Now that the billionaire has returned to the private sector, his charitable organization is putting tens of millions of dollars behind getting other mayors to govern under the same principle. The idea is to make cities all around the United States better places to live.

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December 10 2015 - St. Paul and twelve other cities from Anchorage, Alaska, to Waco, Texas, are getting help from former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg to do better at using data. Bloomberg Philanthropies is announcing the latest round of "What Works Cities'' selections Thursday. The $42 million program ultimately will provide 100 American cities, with expert help to make data publicly accessible, incorporate it better into decision-making and evaluate programs. The first eight choices were announced in August.

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