Learning Opportunities

The What Works Cities Academy

Any city that completes the What Works Cities Assessment is eligible for a variety of learning opportunities within the WWC Academy, including courses, Sprints, in-person trainings, and more.

•  Courses: online self-guided and instructor-led learning opportunities designed to meet participants where they are, covering a range of topics from data fundamentals to advanced data and analytics techniques
•  Sprints: two- to eight-week-long virtual opportunities to work with our expert partners and a cohort of peer cities on a variety of foundational data practices
•  Pop-Up Trainings: one- to two-day-long in-person workshops hosted by a What Works City to deepen an organization’s data skills and build regional connections
•  WWC on Tour: an in-person full-day workshop for a cohort of cities to work with WWC partners on foundational data practices


How do learning opportunities work? 

Below is a full calendar of upcoming courses, Sprints, and in-person learning opportunities being offered by What Works Cities. You can register to participate in these opportunities via the links below or directly in the WWC Academy’s Course Catalog.

All courses, Sprints, and in-person workshops are aligned to the WWC Certification Criteria, and your participation can help you and your city:

•  Become at least one point closer toward being a certified city!
•  Have opportunities from What Works Cities to highlight your progress publicly;
•  Receive certificates from Johns Hopkins University;
•  Earn digital badges to show off your achievements; and
•  Receive periodic progress reports showing how your city is performing and progressing.


How do I create an account?

Upon completing What Works Cities Assessment, your city will receive a unique code giving you an unlimited number of accounts in your local government for free access to learning opportunities. Already completed an assessment and unsure of what your code is? Reach out to govextraining@jhu.edu.

 

How can I host a Pop-Up Training in my city?

If you’re interested in hosting a Pop-Up training, please reach out to govextraining@jhu.edu to discuss options, requirements, and details.


Questions?

For questions regarding available learning opportunities, write Madeleine Weatherhead at madeleine@results4america.orgFor assistance with the WWC Academy platform, reach out to govextraining@jhu.edu.

 


LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES CALENDAR

Data Management: Quality and Standards (DM 202.3)
Start Date: September 4, 2019
4 weeks

This online course, developed by the Center for Government Excellence at Johns Hopkins University, will teach you to recognize the components of data quality, identify common quality issues, and learn methods and practices for improving data quality. In addition, we will discuss the necessary building blocks, use cases, and methods for evaluating and employing effective data standards.

Content:
By the end of this course, you will be able to:

•     Describe common data quality issues
•     Assess government datasets for common data quality issues
•     Define and list popular open data standards
•     Identify strategies for improving data quality and implementing open data standards

Achievable Criteria: 2 Data Governance criteria

•     Your local government has and carries out documented policies or practices to improve data quality.
•    Your local government adopts Civic Data Standards.

Register here by September 3

 


Foundations of Data Governance Structures (DM 203.3)
Start Date: September 4, 2019
4 weeks

This online course developed by the Center for Government Excellence will provide an introduction to data governance principles and structures in government. Participants will gain practical experience in strengthening data management practices and developing or elevating a data governance structure to improve policy making, service delivery, and data-informed decision making.

Content:
Through this course, you will:

•     Envision a sustainable data governance structure
•     Understand the foundational elements of a data governance plan
•     Know how to implement a data governance plan   

Achievable Criteria: 4 Data Governance criteria

•     Your local government maintains a detailed and comprehensive data inventory that makes its data more discoverable and accessible. 
•     Your local government maintains a documented list of data governance responsibilities and meets at least quarterly to carry out those responsibilities.
•     Your local government has and carries out documented policies or practices to improve data quality.
•     Your local government has documented policies or practices to protect privacy and confidentiality.

Register here by September 3

 


Evaluation Foundations
Start Date: September 16, 2019
12 weeks

Why do evaluations matter? City governments take responsibility for providing a wide range of necessary services, and resources are often limited, so every dollar is a trade-off! Through rigorous evaluation, we can build an evidence base and continually improve the quality and efficiency of our programs and services.

In this Sprint, you’ll learn the basic principles of evaluation, apply them to your own real-world challenge, and discuss ways to build up your ongoing evaluation capacity. Join BIT for webinars, calls, and resources with step-by-step information on how to run your own randomized trial and assess your city’s next steps to encourage continuous testing and improvement.

What to Expect:

•     September 18, 2019 Webinar: Introduction to Evaluations
•     Resources (including sample policies, templates, and evaluation guides)
•     2 rounds of office hours for calls with BIT experts for Q&A and support
•     Personalized feedback and document review from a BIT advisor
•     November 27, 2019 Webinar: Sustaining evaluations through evaluation teams
•     December 4, 2019 Webinar: Sustaining evaluations through process and policy

Recommended Participants: Any interested city staff and elected officials interested in running their own randomized field experiment. We highly recommend participants with an opportunity to test a redesigned email communication for this Sprint. For folks who aren’t quite ready to run a trial or who already have lots of experience with field evaluations, we invite you to follow along and join us for the webinar sessions on building and sustaining your evaluation capacity.

Achievable Criteria: 5 Evaluation criteria, 1 General Management criterion

•     Your local government has a policy or ordinance that encourages the use of rigorous evaluation methods for practices, programs, and/or policies.
•     Your local government has defined standards, methodologies, or tools to help staff rigorously evaluate practices, programs, and/or policies.
•     Your local government requires that, as a condition of funding, new or renewed programs will be rigorously evaluated.
•     Your local government has a designated leader and/or team responsible for helping departments conduct experimental or quasi-experimental evaluations.
•     In the past 12 months, your local government has launched two or more experimental or quasi-experimental evaluations.
•     In the past 12 months, your local government has used the results from experimental or quasi-experimental evaluations to make different, or to newly justify, decisions.

Register here by September 15

 


Foundations of Advanced Analytics in Government (PA 203.4)
S
tart Date: October 2, 2019
4 weeks

This online course developed by the Center for Government Excellence will explore the recent use of advanced analytics in US city governments in solving problems and improving outcomes for residents. Participants will gain practical experience in identifying and classifying opportunities for analytics to make an impact and examining analytics projects for evidence of bias.

What to Expect:
By the end of this course, you will be able to:

•     Articulate the value of advanced analytics in a variety of scenarios;
•     Understand how analysts mitigate bias when working with limited data; and
•     Envision how advanced analytics can address operational challenges.

Recommended Participants: Staff responsible for managing city data

Achievable Criteria:  3 Performance Analytics criteria

•     Your local government identifies strategic goals, aligns a diverse set of measures with those goals, and uses data to evaluate progress toward them.
•     Your local government holds performance management meetings during which it reviews data, discusses insights, and makes decisions about its strategic goals at least quarterly.
•     Your local government leaders have the ability to access and incorporate data analysis when necessary for strategic decision-making.

Register here by October 1

 


Foundations of Performance Analytics (PA 201.4)
Start Date: October 2, 2019
4 weeks

This online, instructor-facilitated course developed by the Center for Government Excellence at Johns Hopkins University will provide an introduction to performance analytics principles and their applications in government. Participants will gain practical experience in building or strengthening performance analytics practices and developing innovative solutions to improve government services.

What to Expect:
By the end of this course, you will be able to:

•     Assess organizational readiness for performance analytics;
•     Advocate for the performance analytics model that best suits an organization’s characteristics and priorities;
•     Draft a problem statement for performance analytics; and
•     Construct a goal statement for performance analytics.

Recommended Participants: Staff responsible for managing city data

Achievable Criteria: 4 Performance Analytics criteria

•     Your local government identifies strategic goals, aligns a diverse set of measures with those goals, and uses data to evaluate progress toward them.
•     Your local government holds performance management meetings during which it reviews data, discusses insights, and makes decisions about its strategic goals at least quarterly.
•     Your local government regularly shares its strategic goals, performance measures, and progress toward achieving those goals with the public.
•     Your local government has documented policies or practices to manage the risk of data breach, loss, or unauthorized manipulation.

Register here by October 1

 


Building a Resident-Centered Open Data Program
Start Date: 
October 28, 2019
8 Weeks

Many open data programs take on the impossible task of trying to make all data usable to all people, but when you design for everyone, you often end up designing for no one. Understanding specific community actors and their specific open data needs is critical to bringing about impact through applications of open data. This Sprint will teach participants how to incorporate user-centered design into open data programs by walking through user research processes to develop user personas and open data use cases. Cities will learn best practices in ethnographic interviewing, as well as learn about the elements of a user story and how to create one. Cities can use this approach to start analyzing demand and tailoring data and information for impactful uses, as well as capturing and telling stories that illustrate open data’s benefits to the community.

What to Expect:

•   Understanding the Tactical Data Engagement (TDE) Framework
•   Using Sunlight’s Roadmap to Informed Communities
•   
Developing preliminary user personas and use cases
•   
Sunlight’s maturity model for open data use

Recommended Participants: City staff, in particular, open data program managers and/or departmental data stewards; community engagement staff; public information officers

Achievable Criteria: 4 Stakeholder Engagement criteria

•   Your local government tracks and documents insights about open data users and open data applications, and incorporates user needs into the design and implementation of its open data and transparency practices.
•   Your local government provides clear how-to guidance to help residents access and use city data.
•   
Your local government supports efforts to educate, activate, or upskill partners (e.g., civic groups, vendors, service providers) to better understand and utilize administrative and performance data to deepen community impact.
•   
Your local government provides a clear process for partnership and collaboration with data users for the purpose of creating, revising, and/or improving the local government’s open data policies and practices.

Register here by October 27


Foundations of Open Data (DM 203.3)
Start Date: October 30, 2019
4 weeks

This online course, developed by the Center for Government Excellence at Johns Hopkins University, will teach you how to evaluate Open Data platforms and engage communities in the use and analysis of public data. Drawing on best practices from successful Open Data programs, you will create strategies to strengthen your own Open Data work. Most importantly, you will be able to effectively manage Open Data programs within government organizations.

Content:

By the end of this course, you will be able to:
Understand the key elements of a successful Open Data program and apply them;
•     Recognize and mitigate privacy, security, and confidentiality risks;
•     Begin to develop components of an operating plan for your Open Data program;
•     Grapple with an array of technological considerations and determine the best solutions; and
•     Participate in or lead an Open Data program within a government organization.



Achievable Criteria: 4 Data Governance criteria

•     Your local government maintains a detailed and comprehensive data inventory that makes its data more discoverable and accessible. 
•     Your local government maintains a documented list of data governance responsibilities and meets at least quarterly to carry out those responsibilities.
•     Your local government has and carries out documented policies or practices to improve data quality.
•     Your local government has documented policies or practices to protect privacy and confidentiality.

Register here by October 29, 2019


Foundations of Performance Analytics: Practical Applications (PA 201.4)
Start Date: October 30, 2019
4 weeks

This online, instructor-facilitated course developed by the Center for Government Excellence at Johns Hopkins University will provide an introduction to performance analytics principles and their applications in government. Participants will gain practical experience in building or strengthening performance analytics practices and developing innovative solutions to improve government services.

What to Expect:
By the end of this course, you will be able to:

•     Assess organizational readiness for performance analytics;
•     Advocate for the performance analytics model that best suits an organization’s characteristics and priorities;
•     Draft a problem statement for performance analytics; and
•     Construct a goal statement for performance analytics.

Recommended Participants: Staff responsible for managing city data

Achievable Criteria: 4 Performance Analytics criteria

•     Your local government identifies strategic goals, aligns a diverse set of measures with those goals, and uses data to evaluate progress toward them.
•     Your local government holds performance management meetings during which it reviews data, discusses insights, and makes decisions about its strategic goals at least quarterly.
•     Your local government regularly shares its strategic goals, performance measures, and progress toward achieving those goals with the public.
•     Your local government has documented policies or practices to manage the risk of data breach, loss, or unauthorized manipulation.

Register here by October 29


Open Data Policies
Start Date: January 13, 2020
4 weeks

Public policy is essential because it demonstrates public commitment to lasting change. An open data policy should establish formal governance processes to make public data-sharing institutional and sustainable. Open data policy can not only help cities establish what data will be public or kept private, but can also help build public trust by demonstrating the city’s commitment to lasting transparency and accountability. Cities can go one step further and use policy-drafting to begin engaging residents in conversation about what open data they would like to see. Join the Sunlight Foundation for this quick Sprint that will lead you through the process of generating your own open data policy. 

What to Expect:

•   Sunlight’s Open Data Policy Hub
•   Sunlight’s Guide to Crowdlaw

Recommended Participants: City staff, particularly from cities just starting out with open data

Achievable Criteria: 6 Open Data, Data Governance, and Stakeholder Engagement Criteria

•     Your local government has a publicly available, codified open data policy that commits to data transparency and proactive public disclosure of local government data and data practices.
•     Your local government has a documented process for publishing open data.
•     
Your local government maintains a documented list of data governance responsibilities and meets at least quarterly to carry out those responsibilities.
•     
Your local government has and carries out documented policies or practices to improve data quality.
•     
Your local government has documented policies or practices to protect the privacy and confidentiality of government-held data.
•     
Your local government tracks and documents insights about open data users and open data applications, and incorporates user needs into the design and implementation of its open data and transparency practices.

Register here by January 13, 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PAST LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

Trial “In a Box”
January 16, 2019 – February 20, 2019

Does your city struggle to collect taxes, fines, or unpaid bills? Or maybe your city has an incredible service but faces a challenge in encouraging residents to sign up? Perhaps you want to promote energy or water conservation? Or you want to recruit a diverse group of people into your workforce? Behind each of these goals for your city are a set of decisions you hope your residents will make and, consequently, a set of opportunities to test how your interaction with residents impacts behavior toward your desired outcome. Behavioral science is the systematic study of how people think about the world and how they make decisions, and the expert partners at the Behavioral Insights Team (BIT) work to ensure that realistic models of human behavior are used to make better policies and services. In this Sprint, you’ll have an introduction to BIT and a hands-on opportunity to use our methods to address a real-world challenge, using the science of decision-making and the tools of randomized field experiments. Join BIT for webinars, calls, and resources with step-by-step information on how to run your own trial to test a redesigned email communication. Our experts will support you and guide you through how to launch your trial, analyze, review, and scale what works!

Content:

•     January 16, 2019 Webinar: Trial in a Box Kick-Off
•     Step-by-step guide for running a trial
•     Templates for interventions (emails) and tools for analysis
•     
Support call before your trial launch with a BIT advisor
•     
February 20, 2019 Webinar: [Post-trial] Reviewing Results and Scaling

Recommended Participants: Any interested city staff and elected officials. This Sprint may be
especially relevant for cities with limited previous experience conducting trials. Sprints are typically only open to cities that have completed a Certification Assessment, but we’re making an exception for this Sprint which will be publicly available for any interested local government staff.

Achievable Criteria: 3 Evaluation criteria

•     Your local government has defined standards, methodologies, or tools to help staff rigorously evaluate practices, programs, and/or policies.
•     In the past 12 months, your local government has launched two or more experimental or quasi-experimental evaluations.
•     
In the past 12 months, your local government has used the results from experimental or quasi-experimental evaluations to make different, or to newly justify, decisions.


Comms for Cities
Start Date: February 11, 2019 – March 6, 2019

Cities that build a communications strategy around their work affirm their commitment to solving local challenges; they also build trust and engagement with residents who can reinforce and expand those efforts. Led by What Works Cities Senior Communications Manager Kristin Taylor, this Sprint will help you build your local government’s capacity to use data and evidence to publicly communicate your impact. We’ll start by exploring why effective communication matters, introduce you to best practices in the field, and look at examples of how other cities are sharing their progress. We’ll also introduce you to a range of communications tools at your disposal—from owned and earned media to public appearances and speeches—and help you brainstorm ways to start using them in your own city.

Content: 

•     February 11 pre-webinar reading and worksheet
•     
February 20 webinar
•     Post-webinar reading and worksheet
•     March 6 
closeout video call

Recommended Participants: City staff (in particular, open data program managers and/or departmental data stewards) who want to communicate the impact of their work more effectively; public information officers or other communications personnel; community engagement staff. You’re encouraged to form a local team by participating in the Sprint alongside colleagues in your city and working on the exercises together; cross-departmental/functional teams are especially encouraged.

Achievable Criteria: 1 General Management criteria

•     Your local government regularly uses public communications to share examples of how it is governing using data and evidence and/or stories of progress made as a result.

 


Open Data Policies
February 25, 2019 – March 26, 2019

Public policy is essential because it demonstrates public commitment to lasting change. An open data policy should establish formal governance processes to make public data-sharing institutional and sustainable. Open data policy can not only help cities establish what data will be public or kept private, but can also help build public trust by demonstrating the city’s commitment to lasting transparency and accountability. Cities can go one step further and use policy-drafting to begin engaging residents in conversation about what open data they would like to see. Join the Sunlight Foundation for this quick Sprint that will lead you through the process of generating your own open data policy. 

Content:

•   Sunlight’s Open Data Policy Hub
•   Sunlight’s Guide to Crowdlaw
•   March 5 webinar
•   March 12 webinar
•   March 26 webinar

Recommended Participants: City staff, particularly from cities just starting out with open data

Achievable Criteria: 6 Open Data, Data Governance, and Stakeholder Engagement Criteria

•     Your local government has a publicly available, codified open data policy that commits to data transparency and proactive public disclosure of local government data and data practices.
•     Your local government has a documented process for publishing open data.
•     
Your local government maintains a documented list of data governance responsibilities and meets at least quarterly to carry out those responsibilities.
•     
Your local government has and carries out documented policies or practices to improve data quality.
•     
Your local government has documented policies or practices to protect the privacy and confidentiality of government-held data.
•     
Your local government tracks and documents insights about open data users and open data applications, and incorporates user needs into the design and implementation of its open data and transparency practices.

 


Workshopping RFPs Using Results-Driven Contracting Strategies
April 3, 2019 – May 22, 2019

Procurement is one of the most powerful, yet overlooked, tools in government. Cities spend between one third and one half of their budget through contracts on critical functions, like repairing roads, housing the homeless, or modernizing government by adopting new technology. Yet, too often, procurement is treated as a back-office task rather than a fundamental reflection of an agency’s strategic vision. In this Sprint, led by the Harvard Kennedy School Government Performance Lab (GPL), you’ll have the opportunity to learn how to use your contracts as a tool to achieve your city’s desired goals and outcomes.  The GPL will share the contracting strategies and solutions that they’ve learned from their What Works Cities projects over the past three years. Three cities will have the opportunity to work directly with the GPL to apply results-driven contracting strategies on a single RFP. The results of the RFP workshop will be presented to the full group of participants at the end of the Sprint.

Content:

•     April 3: Two-hour Webinar: An Introduction to Results-Driven Contracting Strategies (open to all)
•     Cohort Workshop Sessions: 3-4 video/phone calls to help three cities implement results-driven contracting strategies on an RFP. This includes reviewing drafts of RFP sections prior to calls.
•     
May 22: One-hour Webinar: Three cities present their updated RFPs and lessons learned (open to all)
•     
GPL RDC Solutions Book
•     
RFP Guiding Questions Worksheet

Achievable Criteria: 3 Results-Driven Contracting criteria

•     Your local government defines strategic goals and desired outcomes for key procurements, contracts, and/or grants.
•     Your local government measures outcomes, impacts, and/or cost-effectiveness for key procurements, contracts, and/or grants.
•     
Your local government structures procurements, contracts, and/or grants to align the vendor’s incentives with the local government’s strategic goals.


Developing a Data Governance Team
May 13, 2019 – June 12, 2019
4 weeks

A data governance board is a group of people who work together to develop an organization’s policies and practices in order to treat data as a strategic asset. Join WWC partner the Center for Government Excellence (GovEx) at Johns Hopkins University for a Sprint designed to help you build the best data governance team. We’ll walk you through how to determine the best focus area that your team should consider supporting, executing, and/or developing policy around.

Content:

•     May 15, 2019 Kick-off Webinar
•     Reading and worksheets

Achievable Criteria: 1 Data Governance criteria

•     Your local government maintains a documented list of data governance responsibilities and meets at least quarterly to carry out those responsibilities.

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Data Management: Quality and Standards (DM 202.2)
Start Date: June 5, 2019
4 weeks

This online course, developed by the Center for Government Excellence at Johns Hopkins University, will teach you to recognize the components of data quality, identify common quality issues, and learn methods and practices for improving data quality. In addition, we will discuss the necessary building blocks, use cases, and methods for evaluating and employing effective data standards.

Content:
By the end of this course, you will be able to:

•     Describe common data quality issues
•     Assess government datasets for common data quality issues
•     Define and list popular open data standards
•     Identify strategies for improving data quality and implementing open data standards

Achievable Criteria: 2 Data Governance criteria

•     Your local government has and carries out documented policies or practices to improve data quality.
•    Your local government adopts Civic Data Standards.


Foundations of Data Governance Structures (DM 203.2)
Start Date: June 5, 2019
4 weeks

This online course developed by the Center for Government Excellence will provide an introduction to data governance principles and structures in government. Participants will gain practical experience in strengthening data management practices and developing or elevating a data governance structure to improve policy making, service delivery, and data-informed decision making.

Content:
Through this course, you will:

•     Envision a sustainable data governance structure
•     Understand the foundational elements of a data governance plan
•     Know how to implement a data governance plan   

Achievable Criteria: 4 Data Governance criteria

•     Your local government maintains a detailed and comprehensive data inventory that makes its data more discoverable and accessible. 
•     Your local government maintains a documented list of data governance responsibilities and meets at least quarterly to carry out those responsibilities.
•     Your local government has and carries out documented policies or practices to improve data quality.
•     Your local government has documented policies or practices to protect privacy and confidentiality.

 


Comms for Cities Sprint: Chief Executives Edition
Start Date: June 10, 2019
4 weeks

Chief executives’ public commitment to driving progress by using data is one of the strongest predictors of a city’s success in building a well-managed local government. That’s because leaders are uniquely positioned—at the helm of City Hall and in the public spotlight—to set, drive, and build support for a strategic vision. And at every step, public communication has a key role to play. Whether your city is just getting started on using data or already has compelling examples of impact to share, communicating your progress is a tremendous opportunity to demonstrate your government’s commitment to delivering results. This Sprint, led by What Works Cities Associate Director of Communication Kristin Taylor, will introduce you to best practices in the field and examples of how other chief executives have put them to use effectively. You’ll also learn about a range of communications tools at your disposal—from owned and earned media to public appearances and speeches—and help you brainstorm ways to start using them in your own city. The Sprint will also feature a guest appearance from former New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu, who will share insights from his own experiences as a chief executive.


Content: 

•    Readings and worksheet #1
•    June 13 webinar with former New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu

•    June 20 webinar

•    Readings and worksheets #2 and #3
•    July 1 closeout video call


Achievable Criteria: 1 General Management criteria

•     Your mayor and/or chief executive uses data and evidence to publicly communicate the work and impact of government.


Foundations of Performance Analytics (PA 201.3)
Start Date: July 10, 2019
4 weeks

This online, instructor-facilitated course developed by the Center for Government Excellence at Johns Hopkins University will provide an introduction to performance analytics principles and their applications in government. Participants will gain practical experience in building or strengthening performance analytics practices and developing innovative solutions to improve government services.

What to Expect:
By the end of this course, you will be able to:

•     Assess organizational readiness for performance analytics;
•     Advocate for the performance analytics model that best suits an organization’s characteristics and priorities;
•     Draft a problem statement for performance analytics; and
•     Construct a goal statement for performance analytics.

Recommended Participants: Staff responsible for managing city data

Achievable Criteria: 4 Performance Analytics criteria

•     Your local government identifies strategic goals, aligns a diverse set of measures with those goals, and uses data to evaluate progress toward them.
•     Your local government holds performance management meetings during which it reviews data, discusses insights, and makes decisions about its strategic goals at least quarterly.
•     Your local government regularly shares its strategic goals, performance measures, and progress toward achieving those goals with the public.
•     Your local government has documented policies or practices to manage the risk of data breach, loss, or unauthorized manipulation.

Register here by July 9


Foundations of Advanced Analytics in Government (PA 203.3)
S
tart Date: July 10, 2019
4 weeks

This online course developed by the Center for Government Excellence will explore the recent use of advanced analytics in US city governments in solving problems and improving outcomes for residents. Participants will gain practical experience in identifying and classifying opportunities for analytics to make an impact and examining analytics projects for evidence of bias.

What to Expect:
By the end of this course, you will be able to:

•     Articulate the value of advanced analytics in a variety of scenarios;
•     Understand how analysts mitigate bias when working with limited data; and
•     Envision how advanced analytics can address operational challenges.

Recommended Participants: Staff responsible for managing city data

Achievable Criteria:  3 Performance Analytics criteria

•     Your local government identifies strategic goals, aligns a diverse set of measures with those goals, and uses data to evaluate progress toward them.
•     Your local government holds performance management meetings during which it reviews data, discusses insights, and makes decisions about its strategic goals at least quarterly.
•     Your local government leaders have the ability to access and incorporate data analysis when necessary for strategic decision-making.

Register here by July 9


Conducting a Data Inventory
Start Date: August 12, 2019
4 weeks

City data is an incredible asset, and knowing what data your city collects leads to efficiency, increases accountability, and eases citywide reporting, decision-making, and performance optimization. Data inventories are a great way to figure out what data are being collected (and if there is any duplication among departments), determine what systems are in use, promote transparency, and develop data publishing plans. In this Sprint, experts from the Center for Government Excellence (GovEx) at Johns Hopkins University will help you understand fully the importance of inventorying and the open data program, and will guide you on how to begin to inventory your city’s data.  

What to Expect:

•     August 14, 2019 Conducting a Data Inventory Kick-off webinar
•     A data inventory guide
•     
Templates to get started

Recommended Participants: Staff responsible for managing city data

Achievable Criteria: 1 Data Governance criteria

•     Your local government maintains a detailed and comprehensive data inventory that makes its data more discoverable and accessible.

Register here by August 11